Pressrelease – EISCAT_3D

Pressrelease – EISCAT_3D

EISCAT_3D, the new Arctic radar for space weather research gets go-ahead for construction Download PDF   A new international research radar called EISCAT_3D was given the green light to proceed this month, promising a step-change in understanding the effect of solar storms and space weather on the upper atmosphere in the Arctic, including the magnificent Northern Lights. At a total cost of 685 million Swedish crowns, the EISCAT_3D facility will be distributed across three sites in Northern Scandinavia - in Skibotn, Norway, near Kiruna in Sweden, and near Kaaresuvanto in Finland. Each site will consist of about 10.000 antennas fed by a powerful 5 MW transmitter at Skibotn and a receiver at each of the three sites. The EISCAT_3D project will start in September 2017 with site preparations to begin in summer 2018. The radar is expected to be operational in 2021. EISCAT_3D will be the world’s leading facility of its kind, offering a critically important window to the upper atmosphere and the near-Earth...
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EISCAT_3D test site

Trip to Tromsø Lennart has made a trip to Tromsø, to make sure that the EISCAT_3D test site in ready for the coming deliveries. The snow is melting, but spring is about three weeks late. Tromsø also greeted Lennart with a snowfall. But this is not that extraordinarily in this latitudes, this time of the year. ...
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Rocket inauguration

Rocket inauguration at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics EISCAT Kiruna staff participated in the inauguration of the rocket, Centaure 2B, that Esrange Space Center has "lent out" to the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF). The rocket and the rocket launcher were first inaugurated by the former director of the institute, Professor Emeritus Bengt Hultqvist, 50 years ago. Bengt Hultqvist, now turning ninety, was in honor of his work for the institute and the space research in Kiruna and Sweden, invited to inaugurate the rocket once more. The present director of the IRF, Stas Barabash, and the director of Esrange Space Center, Lennart Poromaa held short speeches. Bengt talked a little of his work and of his first inauguration of this rocket and then crushed the traditional champagne bottle on the rocket, as he once did 50 years earlier. Afterwards the staff of IRF and EISCAT Scientific Association, and other participants, were invited for a lunch in the open. The chef of IRF and his assistants treated the lunch...
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Asteroid gets the name Wannberg

11807 Wannberg Asta Pellinen-Wannberg gets an asteroid named after her. Motivation: Asta Pellinen-Wannberg (b. 1953) is a Swedish geophysicist and astronomer at Umeå University known for radar observation of meteors. She studies interaction of small meteoroids with the atmosphere using high-power large-aperture radars. "Asta Pellinen-Wannberg was the first scientist in the world to use big scatter radar to study meteors, triggered by small particles from space, penetrating the atmosphere. Together with Gudmund Wannberg, then, Technical Manager and Deputy Director of the EISCAT radar facility, as well as Teacher at Umeå University, they discovered by accident in December 1990 that meteors could be systematically studied with the EISCAT radar. This work is now rewarded and it is nice that the asteroid is wearing the pioneers' common surname. - forskingn.se (latest 2017-05-09) About the asteroid: Earlier, the Asteroid 1981 was called EH17 - and now 11807 Wannberg. The asteroid was discovered on March 1, 1981 by an astronomer named S.J. Bus at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. It moves within...
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Svalbard

Assar held a talk about Svalbard Assar works at the Headquarters in Kiruna. He recently returned form Svalbard, where he has been working on our radar site for the last couple of years. Today Assar held a talk about Svalbard. Svalbard is a very special place in many ways. The archipelago belongs to Norway, but through a treaty: Spetsbergtraktaten, Svalbard is open for the Treaty Member States to pursue business activities, hunting and fishing there. It is a interesting place for space science due to it's location near the north pole.   ...
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March for Science

Mike marched for science In support of scientists all over the world Mike participated in The Science March last Saturday. Together with several hundred people Mike marched against fake news and reduced funding for research. The march in Tromsø was just one of about 600 marches worldwide to defend knowledge, independent research and fearless communication of scientific research. All over the world we see the dangerous effects of mistrust in science and with this march we show that we do not accept this. Science is science, facts are facts. Science is not an opinion.     ...
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